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COVID19/Coronavirus

A compilation of resources about the COVID19/Coronavirus pandemic

Introduction to the Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCov) by the World Health Organization (WHO)

New York State and City Local Information

NYS COVID-19 Travel Advisory


In response to increased rates of COVID-19 transmission in certain states within the United States, and to protect New York’s successful containment of COVID-19, the State has joined with New Jersey and Connecticut in jointly issuing a travel advisory for anyone returning from travel to states that have a significant degree of community-wide spread of COVID-19.

Governor Cuomo issued Executive Order 205, requiring all travelers coming from states with significant rates of transmission of COVID-19 to quarantine for a 14-day period from the time of their last contact.

 

New York State Department of Health COVID-19 Tracker


View a county-by-county breakdown of testing and positive cases and facility level reporting of staff testing around New York State. Features daily trends, fatality data, and more.

U.S. Federal Government Resources and Information

General Updates and Information

St. Francis College's Coronavirus Resources for Staff and Students

eBooks

Introduction to Modern Virology

Praised forits clarity of presentation and accessibility, Introduction to Modern Virology has been a successful student text for over 30 years. It provides a broad introduction to virology, which includes the nature of viruses, the interaction of viruses with their hosts and the consequences of those interactions that lead to the diseases we see.  This new edition contains a number of important changes and innovations including: The consideration of immunology now covers two chapters, one on innate immunity and the other on adaptive immunity, reflecting the explosion in knowledge of viral interactions with these systems.  The coverage of vaccines and antivirals has been expanded and separated into two new chapters to reflect the importance of these approaches to prevention and treatment.  Virus infections in humans are considered in more detail with new chapters on viral hepatitis, influenza, vector-borne diseases, and exotic and emerging viral infections, complementing an updated chapter on HIV.   The final section includes three new chapters on the broader aspects of the influence of viruses on our lives, focussing on the economic impact of virus infections, the ways we can use viruses in clinical and other spheres, and the impact that viruses have on the planet and almost every aspect of our lives. A good basic understanding of viruses is important for generalists and specialists alike. The aim of this book is to make such understanding as accessible as possible, allowing students across the biosciences spectrum to improve their knowledge of these fascinating entities.

Virus Taxonomy

The practical need to partition the world of viruses into distinguishable, universally agreed upon entities is the ultimate justification for developing a virus classification system. Since 1971, the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) operating on behalf of the world community of virologists has taken on the task of developing a single, universal taxonomic scheme for all viruses infecting animals (vertebrate, invertebrates, and protozoa), plants (higher plants and algae), fungi, bacteria, and archaea. The current report builds on the accumulated taxonomic construction of the eight previous reports dating back to 1971 and records the proceedings of the Committee since publication of the last report in 2005. Representing the work of more than 500 virologists worldwide, this report is the authoritative reference for virus organization, distinction, and structure.

To Catch a Virus

Expert storytellers weave together the science, technological advances, medical urgencies, and human stories that chronicle the development of the field of diagnostic virology.

Human Emerging and Re-Emerging Infections

Emerging and re-emerging pathogens pose several challenges to diagnosis, treatment, and public health surveillance, primarily because pathogen identification is a difficult and time-consuming process due to the "novel" nature of the agent. Proper identification requires a wide array of techniques, but the significance of these diagnostics is anticipated to increase with advances in newer molecular and nanobiotechnological interventions and health information technology. Human Emerging and Re-emerging Infections covers the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, clinical features, and public health risks posed by new viral and microbial infections. The book includes detailed coverage on the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis, development of various diagnostic tools, diagnostic assays and their limitations, key research priorities, and new technologies in infection diagnostics. Volume 1 addresses viral and parasitic infections, while volume 2 delves into bacterial and mycotic infections. Human Emerging and Re-emerging Infections is an invaluable resource for researchers in parasitologists, microbiology, Immunology, neurology and virology, as well as clinicians and students interested in understanding the current knowledge and future directions of infectious diseases.

Pandemic Planning

Preparedness and rigorous planning on community, state, and regional levels are critical to containing the threat of pandemic illness. Steeped in research and recommendations from lessons learned, Pandemic Planning describes the processes necessary for the efficient and effective preparation, prevention, response, and recovery from a pandemic threa

The Pandemic Century : One Hundred Years of Panic, Hysteria and Hubris

Like sharks, epidemic diseases always lurk just beneath the surface. This fast-paced history of their effect on mankind prompts questions about the limits of scientific knowledge, the dangers of medical hubris, and how we should prepare as epidemics become ever more frequent. Ever since the 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic, scientists have dreamed of preventing catastrophic outbreaks of infectious disease. Yet, despite a century of medical progress, viral and bacterial disasters continue to take us by surprise, inciting panic and dominating news cycles. From the Spanish flu and the 1924 outbreak of pneumonic plague in Los Angeles to the 1930 'parrot fever' pandemic and the more recent SARS, Ebola, and Zika epidemics, the last 100 years have been marked by a succession of unanticipated pandemic alarms. Like man-eating sharks, predatory pathogens are always present in nature, waiting to strike; when one is seemingly vanquished, others appear in its place. These pandemics remind us of the limits of scientific knowledge, as well as the role that human behaviour and technologies play in the emergence and spread of microbial diseases.